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and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
way? what constitutes the wrong way? here in united states and in the middle east there is enormous debate over how to handle iran's pursuit of a nuclear enrichment capability, a capability which would give iran the ability to manufacture nuclear weapons if they chose to do so. and obvious a this is an issue that's been with us for a very long time. i remember i first encountered it in immediate aftermath of the gulf war in 1991 when israel purchased 25 longer-range f-15 e. strike fighters. and those fighters were designated not f-15 e., but f-15-i. and the manufacture said that the i was for israel. if you spoke to israeli air force pilots and commanders, what the uniform would say to you is now now now that i is for iraq. this is an issue, this is a problem, it is a threat that the israelis have been thinking about for a very long time. they has been a great deal of effort trying to figure out how to develop a military option to disarm iran, to destroy its nuclear program if they ever chose to do so. and they've been working very deciduous lead at the. but by the same token, you w
change in the united states and how it's been shifted pretty rapidly over time as the great state of nevada. obama is running ahead of though not nearly as far as he did in 2008. but it still will cut off on my monitor but you can see an incredible increase of nine percentage points for the share of eligible voters who are minorities according to the data between 2008 and 2012. that's a massive demographic tide against the republicans and you can see there's been a decline of five percentage points in the share of voters that are colleges john became group into bills and eight. that is a very quick run through some of the swing states in the 2008 election. maybe it's time for me to step back, catch my breath and just say why is this. why is this going on? why does obama have the lead he does? why is from the having difficulty, and what many people argue should be the core limping along economy and a president that has done so much as the defense and its face it popular at the beginning like the health care reform act and so long, the stimulus looked upon unfavorably by a lot of vo
difficult issues that face the united states. so we are happy to have you. it's important to remember that yes, let's have quick applause for bob turner. [applause] do you know why? he may one day become a kingmaker himself. what we have to point out is acknowledging bob turner's election is that it requires for [inaudible conversations] across party lines. if you didn't know, bob turner is a republican in what would be otherwise considered a democratic district of brooklyn. mayor koch is not the first time -- and queens, you're right. so sorry. thank you for correcting me. but this is not the first time that mayor koch has crossed party lines. of course, remember, he voted for george bush in the second election, 2004. he actually famously said i don't agree with a single thing that george bush -- >> single domestic issue. >> with the exception of the fact that i think he is handling terrorism and a superior way. and that he was the most important issue. in the case of the movements, support for bob turner, you and i did an event shortly thereafter in which you explained your support
-year plan. how many of you have studied the plan? you know, in the united states and u.s. context, the entire idea of five-year plans sounds preposterous. they are taken serious in china and this one in particular is like a chain in the curve for the chinese economy. it says basically looking backwards china's successes have almost been enough low-wage factoriescome the building, road roads and all the rasputin the future under this plan they want to have more high-tech. they want infotech industry from a biotech industry coming clean take energy and aerospace industry. so the idea of the country can move from its current level of technology is something played out in this industry and a lot of others. another major theme you see about china in this field and others is the style of what i think of as the real estate centric theory of modernization. if you look for an explanation of almost anything happening in china now and say well why is the seaport go in there? why is this ancient village removed? why is x, y or z happening? real estate deals may not be the only answer, but usu
right now . socialized medicine in the united states of america. what is that about care so as it about writing the book to it ocd ronnie touched on this because this was one of the central arguments. as i started to write ipod, well, of course obama is redistributing wealth here tell he is a socialist. in fact, i have a section in the book called this a socialist is a big fat liar. i was on with neil cavuto last week. he said to me, come on. look at this title. cassette, tell me what part of that is inaccurate. he is skinny. he goes on the secret burger runs, but he's not taking any rate. he's a socialist. he's lied to the american people day in and day out. prime example, will cut the deficit in half and my first term we all know how that turned out. he inherited a for under $50 billion annual deficit. he has quadrupled the. every year he's been in office he has run between 13 and $17 trillion annual deficit . added five to international debt and just three years. to give it to see -- this white. it took in three years at 5 trillion. for the first 216 years of the republic that is how
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
enormous pleasure to welcome to the podium united states secretary of education arne duncan. [applause] [applause] >> thank you so much for that kind introduction. you don't want me in the treasury. i'm going keep the remarks brief. i would love to have a conversation with you. i'm thrilled to get in the focus on education. it's important for the country to be engaging in. a lot of challenges and hard work ahead of us. with i think we have a chance to breakthrough in fundamental way. i'll give you a snapshot where we think we are, where we're trying to go and the next stipes. a couple of numbers haunt me. 25% dropout rate in the country. that's a million of kids leaving our schools. no good jobs out there for them. and many of the african and latino that 40, 50, 60%. we are devastating entire communities unless we [inaudible] we used to lead the world in college graduate. today we are 1 4th. we wonder why we are struggling economically. i continue to think about the skill set in a time of employment rates we have as much as 2 million high wage high skills jobs that we can't fill. i thi
in the british foreign office in the united states should have the capacity to keep our eye on more than one war upon. >> i suppose the key was to negotiate. it didn't work that way. if it didn't work that way in a western democracy, the do very little chance of the work in that way in afghanistan, therefore the extent to which there is an engagement, whether it's track to her otherwise with the taliban if they think they're important because you can wait a long, long time for the kind of progress in security level, which may never happen. >> you're absolutely right. i keep using that as an example. there was no military plan that has that is the subject to defeating the insurgency. our strategy is not defeating the insurgency. >> affair in which he said among the afghan leadership. >> i think they generally want assessment. they have huge differences on what terms are prepared to accept. if you talk to afghan women, they are very worthy attempts of settlement will be to their detriment. you also talk and they don't want to give up the amount of power they've had. they've had more power than the
been -- had, done, which is to explain her strong connection to the united states. has not only has she been to this country five times -- 11 times, excuse me, five of them on private holidays, the most vacation time she has ever spent anywhere outside her privateutsi estate, some of her closestv friends are americans which may be one of the biggest surprises. she is also known -- she has also known every president from harry truman to barack obama with the exception of lyndonm johnson who tried but fail today meet her. i remember being impressed whenr an official at the american embassy in london told me that during the memorial service att st. paul's cathedral after the 9/11 attacks, the queen sang every single word of the american national anthem. and i would betsi that therem. aren't any presidents who canh sing all the words to "god save the queen." since we are here today on the national mall, i thought i woul focus on the queen's fondness ml for this country and its people, pote little known and well known, and in so doingnown illuminate corners of her life that can help you unde
tack toy are -- brings out a jar and it's full of disdense that he -- we have that in the united states. and it's sort of different concepts it's not that a dictator disappeared people. but it is that violence and drugs really disappear huge segments of the black community and the bad choices. i began to meet these men and start to think about this. and ask myself, you you know what are their stories. but two, how about operating in a role which i can acknowledge my failures and their failures and respect them despite that. how do i deal with it? i think i deal with trauma. if you have an eye injury, you have eye forms scar tissue over the wound. i was playing soccer, you have to ask me about spanish. when i was playing soccer with latino kids. somebody can kicked the ball and it hit any the eye. my retina almost got detached. i had to see a specialist and it formed over it. it didn't get detached. then the scar formed over the scar. they thought it was at risk of breaking. it was at risk of being detached if i had experienced a huge blunt force trauma to my head. i won't tell you which
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
that threatens the very viability of the united states senate. last july the obama administration used the flimsiest of arguments, granted themselves the authority to waive federal welfare work requirements. and whether or not what they, the obama administration intends to accomplish with these waivers is good welfare policy has been the subject of robust debate. i'm not here to argue the merits or lack thereof of the underlying welfare policy goals of the obama administration. what i am here to do is to make a plea to my fellow senators, as senators we simply cannot let this action stand. if we fail to stand together as senators in defense of our constitutional duty to be the ones to draft legislation, we might as well pack up our bags and go home, because we will have opened the door for this administration and future administrations to unilaterally decide they can waive precedent, congressional intent, and actual legislative language as senators have scrupulously debated and compromised on. if we do not stand together as the united states senate, we will be ceding our authority to t
'm not trying to say new york is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we're all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time, new york is the great magnet for immigrants, from around the world from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward has been a place where discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political culture, their own loyalties and allegiances come in their ethnic and national religious cultures and have ended up jostling each other often. and especially at times of war, this has been the case in new york. sometimes with tragic consequences. so i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting today. so this is april of 1861, after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in this world war began. this is one of the mass rall
obama who emerges as a whole global treen amex systems until he becomes president of the united states. >> host: >> guest: in butler county is where obama's mother grew up and natalie and the rest of the store in topeka which is the state capital because he lived there for a short time. his father, the president's great grandfather was an auto repair man and a great-grandmother was married at age 15 and a very difficult marriage but in the book begins with suicide in topeka and then stanley, the president's grandfather comes back to butler county and that's where he reads the grandmother and the story begins but it wouldn't have happened without but suicide. >> host: we want to show a montage shot by your wife on your trip to kansas in april, 2009. >> in all conversations [inaudible conversations] >> a >> it's where his great grandmother committed suicide, and stan dunham, obama's grandfather, was 8 years old aty the time, and his mother, obama's great grandmother, died. they lived in the little house here down on buchanan street down a few blocks, and the great grandfather, ralph dunh
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
in a factory, and vanzetti had an odd job after immigrating to the united states and he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants, but in the united states, they became radicalized of the anarchist leader who advocated violence. but it was ordinary, and i think the fact that they were just too ordinary guys caught in a nightmare that it's part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think they are there for the grace of god. >> finally, susan tejada come something about your book was april 15th, 1920 you put it in context. it was also the opening day of the boston red sox baseball season, first year without babe ruth. why do you do that, why you put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring their readers and to the story to make it seem real so that the readers might feel they are in the courtroom, they are in the prison and in the death chamber. it's important to make history come alive. >> susan tejada this is your first book right? >> first adult book. >> you've written children's books? what is the name of one? >> i've written childre
as assistant secretary of the navy and went on to become vice president and president of the united states. in 1916, roosevelt the secretary of the navy. he has been appointed to the record as the associate justice by president william howard taft. but he resigned in 1916 to become the republican candidate for president and he ran against woodrow wilson and a dreadful campaign he was the odds favor, but ultimately lost california by 4000 votes and therefore the election. he went to bed the night of the election thinking he had one. franklin roosevelt was said that wilson supporter went to bed thinking he's had one also. and the next morning the returns from the midwest and particularly california came in and it turned out that wilson one the election just rarely. roosevelt continued as assistant secretary of the navy and then he has to act to private practice in new york city. roosevelt in 1920 became the vice residential candidate of the democratic party, running with governor james cox of ohio. they got trapped by calvin coolidge and warren harding, coolidge's republican party. and at th
, and he is the president of the united states. wilson, he is sick. but he sends his secretary of state to the convention to emcee the convention. >> host: he wanted the nomination. >> guest: he wanted the nomination, and harding, coolidge, hoover, fdr is on the ticket as a vice presidential candidate, and so you have this hook and so much else going on with the league of nations and everything other thing. and 1960, we move on to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six but we have three of the biggest name brands in presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, and so very, very different. so very, very different amibitions in terms of personal, and something which i think resonates so much with folks who are reading books today. 1948, a great cliffhanger, and we love to listen to the experts and get the weather reports, and they're always wrong, and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always wrong, and by god we love it when we're smarter than they are, and it turns out we can look back in hindsight and see how wrong they were in 1948. and
. i would see a press corps, especially from the united states which had really not very much experience to draw on, most of that world war ii cohort, like ernie pyle, john hersey, edward r. murrow, martha kilbourne, a lot of these folks had very little experience as war correspondent. some of them had experience as a journalist, but very few of them had been covering world war i. and so for them it was all new. and i was really, really impressed with the quality and the beauty indeed of some the things they wrote. ernie pyle, you know, jimmy had always been kind of a cartoon character. you know, the journalist in the foxhole. but some of the things he wrote were choose, i would love to share. >> that would be great spent see if i can put my finger on it passage here that i think really evokes his finest work. and it was the kind of thing he wrote that cat people, let's see, in the service at that time. some of the soldiers would send letters back home to the family and say i'm not going to bother sending you any more letters. if you really want to know what the war is like yo
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we are all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time new york is a great magnet for immigrants from around the world, from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward, has been a place for discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political cultures, the room loyalties and allegiances their ethnic and natural visages cultures and have ended up jostling each other. and especially at times of war come of this has the case in the year, sometimes the tragic consequences. i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting tonight. so this is april of 1861 after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in the civil war began.
be defunded. and by that time the largest affiliate in the united states was city year. the governor of massachusetts, mitt romney, was on the board. and then send me a letter saying, michael brown is nodding his head, sent me a letter saying, with 49 other, 40 other governors, we should continue this. this is important. so i called him and i was out of the white house and i said governor, i love city year. that's what americorps is all about. i hope you'll help me save it. and he urged the republican congress to continue to support city year, and he urged the white house to do it. and they did. i just visited a city year program in south africa, johannesburg, where the youth unemployment rate exceeds 40%, but 80% of the city year volunteers in johannesburg had a job that day they leave city year. so it turns out to be good economics as well as good for the society. all of you should know that, and i wanted you to know what. and, governor, i thank you for being here. the podium is yours. [applause] >> thank you, mr. president. it's an honor to be here this morning. and i appreciate y
have a lot of other nations that in concert with the united states also believes that the unilateral imposition of the trading scheme is inappropriate. finally, there appears to be some recognition on the europeans died of late but there's a real consequence for doing this. so we will continue to press for the appropriate avenues for the resolution of an issue like this. we are continuing to make it clear that we have serious concerns and do not believe it should be implemented and i think the consequences of the european union moving ahead are much better understood ide these days. >> mr. chairman, thank you are just a few comments and i think it is worth noting. oftentimes we point out when there are mistakes made or cost overruns, but i just have to say that since i've been involved, i open in my remarks there was a time when the faa couldn't tell us what it was. it was not until secretary lahood was appointed secretary of transportation and randy babbitt, the former administrator came into office in the 50 acting administrator on board two years ago that there was stakeholder inv
and civil service professionals who represent the united states around the globe. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate will proceed to that measure. mr. durbin scwarks i further ask the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate and any related statements be printed in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: i understand there is a bill at the desk. i ask for its first reading. the presiding officer: the clerk will read the title of the bill for the first time. the clerk: h.r. 3949, an act to extend the fisa amendments act of 2008 for five years. mr. durbin: i now ask for a second reading and in order to place the bill on the calendar, i object to my own request. the presiding officer: the objection is heard. the title of the bill will be read again on the second legislative day. mr. durbin: i ask unanimous consent when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 2:00 p.m. on monday, september 17, 2012, for a pro forma session.
such a concerted series of vicious personal attacks directed against any president of the united states. completely funded in this case and a pair of brothers, big oil barons with the assistance of an all too compliant american media and you add those three elements together and you get the obama machine. i would just like to say a little bit about each of those elements and then open it up for questions until c-span tells us that the cameras are turned off. and, you know, let's start with a hate directed against obama. first of all, i have to say, i think criticism of any american president is fair game. i am part of the white house press corps. i go to the white house every day. i would have been there today if i wasn't here. every day in front of the white house on pennsylvania avenue there is a crowd of people protesting something. and i love that. i really do. i make a point of checking and what they are there for what the issue of the days. a very healthy part of our democracy. and criticism of the president, of course, has been around for a long time. the of this presidential campaign in his
of the united states or how inspired they are by the people of the united states, because i think that we have all seen people and may be blessed that walter cronkite and all the rest. they saw americans at their absolute best. yes, ma'am. of curious and these stories were quite extraordinary. has there been a similar book on reporters like bob who cover the pacific like you have on this story? >> knollwood there is a diet that i know that is thinking about doing the book. [laughter] will you buy it if i do it? >> it's a fascinating story in itself. >> the pacific war i think too often gets overlooked especially the journalism and all the rest were phenomenal reporters covering the pacific i still love homer. how did you get into doing at. tell us a little bit of the book. >> my buddies at georgetown university, for history buffs and world war ii devotees when mr. cronkite passed away i was struck by two things. one is instead of the usual jd e-mails that we exchange when people leave us it is pure reference that was the death of the response. then i was struck when few of the ovaries mentione
. these are not just names that we read. god bless the united states of america. welles remy crowther and my outgoing godfather, michael maca rallied. not a day goes by where i don't interview. we all love and miss you so much. robert l. cruikshank john robert cruz grace yu cua kenneth john cubas francisco cruz cubero richard j. cudina neil james cudmore thomas patrick cullen lll joyce cummings brian thomas cummins michael cunningham robert curatolo laurence damian curia paul dario curioli beverly curry andrew peters charles green. michael s. curtin gavin cushny carlos as dacosta. brian powell vow. thomas a. damaskinos and my brother, fred mercury. we miss you so much. we're all here and your friends miss you, too. >> and my cousin, port authority police officer come you are angel camacho everyday. you will never be forgotten. jeannine marie damiani-jones patrick w. danahy mary san antonio. dwight donald darcy elizabeth ann darling annette andrea dataram lawrence davidson michael allen davidson scott matthew davidson titus davidson niurka davila ada and davis clinton davis wayne terrial davis anthony
york city was the vice capital of the united states. and it was an open secret it was the vice capital. it dangled more opportunities for prostitution, gambling and all-night drinking than any other city. 40,000 prostitutes worked in new york. some in brothels some on the street. there were illegal casinos, booking. this was the town teddy roosevelt was going clean it up in 1895. visitors could immediately sense the wicked possibility of the place. new york new york city had a nude weather vane. at the highest point in midtown see at the top of madison square. you can see it clearly from the ground and, you know, jay leno called the statute of liberty the hood ornament. nude diane was the hood ornament want breasts outstretched arms told new yorkers the direction of the winds. near madison square garden was the restaurant and can casino. there was a forgotten hotel there. and this housed one of the city great landmarks. it's a tame picture of it. you got a sense of an art gallery type bar. here's a better reason why thousands upon thousand of tourists came. william f a former manager c
of the united states air are space industry. and i said, you got the right tyson? i fly in airplanes, i don't fly airplanes. but -- we know who we are. we read your writers. i said could they have read? what, how? and i said who else? so they read me the list of other people buzz al drin was going to be on the commission, and just in case you don't remember, he was apollo 11 astronaut. the second person to walk on the moon of the first mission to the lunar surface. so -- all right there are wellful commissioners appointed to this. all right. now i'm from new york city, born and raised. in new york, you can go all day without ever even seeing a republican. okay. [laughter] so -- [laughter] [applause] m i lying? i'm not. i'm not -- [laughter] there goes one, he's in the corner, in the back, i think. so i'm getting called by a republican president and i'm an academic, and i later learn that -- i've learned that george bush at yale did not do well at the astronomy class. and so -- they said, we have to ask you a few questions. and out came a series of questions. all the questions that are like
important innovation in public education over the past generation in the united states. there are many myths and many misconceptions about charters and about the motivations and goals of many in the charter movement. you saw some of that play out in the chicago teachers strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states who think charters are an unmitigated good or alternatively an existential threat. the reality is they are neither of those. we are exceedingly fortunate to have roland prior with us today. i will introduce roland before i introduce the rest of the panel after he finishes. the project has done considerable work with roland. we are fortunate to have been able to do that. he has prepared an extraordinary paper which he is going to summarize. i would say roland's resume is a little hard to read. you would think it must be fake or something. how could anybody have done so much so quickly? i particularly want to know what a titanium lion is but i won't blanc that year. he is doing extraordinarily important and vital and groundbreaking work. if we are going to ever turn
, the congress of the united states authorize the post office to allow newspapers to exchange one copy with each other newspaper, for free. that would be carried at no cost through the postal service, which allowed editors to swap and actually like borrow and lifted from each other. it was a great way of filling up your newspaper for free in the early days. also in the 18th century and early 19 center a lot of state government and the federal government did not have their own printing capacity. so everything that they needed printed had to be chopped out to a printer. this is one of the ways they kept a lot of those early newspapers afloat, the printer who is on the side of the party of power would get those contracts and would be the one who was authorized to print everything, early currencies, lottery tickets, detections of laws, all of these things would be given as a political favor to the editor who was on the right side. >> so today, just a circuit to the present before it could work questions, there is a mood, it varies from day to day i suppose. some days it's panic, some days it's excit
was basically the here sherlock holmes of the united states and incredible reputation of the dblght. he made himself rich by taking gifts. he-- roosevelt could not tolerate the behavior. a world wind trying to swept the corrupt era out. you can't imagine the courage of the man to come in to a city that was this corrupt and this used to doing it a certain way and reckless reformers attitude change the whole place around. it's amazing. anyhow, arthur wrote a front page item ten days in to roosevelt's tenure for the new york world, he say we have a real police commissioner his name is though door vees roosevelt. he speaking english accurately. i done it or i seen it. he talks more like a boston man or englishman than a new york police commissioner. the voice is the hardest trial. it is an campus rating voice, a raspy voice. what do you amount to anyway? in the good old days the own of a voice would have been clubbed. now the bravest policeman must listen to the voice, obey it and seem to like it. they treated roosevelt very well in the beginning. a month in to the job he did something unusual.
. a duly trained catholic child, grew up by nuns, came to the united states at almost 18, and i married, do all the things i was told, and when my husband departed with someone else, i was there to take care of three children, to work, clean up, and education to really make a good salary. i continued taking care of them in when they finished high school, i went and i did my ged and became a nurse. that's my strongest memory of you is one day in the debate, surrounded by men, dealing with a situation of abortion, and they all rant and rave why women shouldn't do it, and you just said, quietly, but you stopped everybody from speaking when you said, gentlemen, remember where we are talking where the territory is. this belongs to her, and if she chooses, her doctor is compliant, but it is not for you to say. those words i passed to my daughters who have grown up to be independent, outrageously self-empowered. what i never had in my youth and in my childhood and growing up years and years as a wife. they have been able to stand by themselves, i put your books in their hands, and i went back in s
the united states. to go from new york city to albany, new york, if you took a hours, that would take you three days, on our own horse or a coach. if you took a boat up the hudson, that would take three days if the wind was right. if the wind was bad it could take you a couple -- ten days to get from new york city to albany. and now on a train it's like, what, few hours. so, yes, there are restrictions that come from not being able to get around. but the flip
was a skilled worker and a shoe that are it. vanzetti had done not jobs after immigrating to the united states shortly before the arrest he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants but in the united states they became radicalized and they were anarchists. they really were anarchists. followers of an anarchist leader who advocated violence if necessary to achieve his goals. but it was there ordinariness and i think the fact that they were just you know, to ordinary guys, the nightmare that is part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think there by the grace of god. >> finally susan tejada one of the things that struck the about your look is april 15, nine t. 20 of putting context it was also the opening day of the boston red sox of the baseball season. the first year without babe ruth. do that? put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring readers into the story to make it seem real so that readers might feel they are in the courtroom. player in the prison, and so it's important to make history come alive as much as possible. >> susan te
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